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The (updated) list of E3 2020 replacement events

The E3-shaped hole in the 2020 video game calendar has been filled by multiple digital events, livestreams, and festivals  Here’s our guide.

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E3 2020 replacement events
ESA / Thumbsticks

The E3-shaped hole in the 2020 video game calendar has been filled by multiple digital events, live streams, and festivals  Here’s our guide to every confirmed E3 2020 replacement taking place this summer.

In the absence of E3 2020, publishers, media groups, and, erm, entrepreneurs, have stepped in to ensure that there’s a steady stream of information on this year’s new video games and next-gen consoles.

However, keeping track of every event is increasingly difficult. Many publishers are showing games on multiple channels, as well as holding their own live streams. To help you make sense of it all, here’s our guide to every confirmed event.

We’ll keep this page updated over the summer, so why not treat your web browser to a new bookmark.

Updated: June 1, 2020 with new details from IGN, Sony, BitSummit, and New Game+ Expo

Replacement E3 2020 events

Summer Game Fest

Dates: May – August, 2020

Geoff Keighley and iam8bit wasted no time in pitching up the Summer Game Fest tent on the grave of E3 2020. The festival is a four-month-long series of live streams and announcements from publishers and platform holders including 2K, Activision, Bungie, PlayStation, and EA. The festival concludes with Gamescom Opening Night Live in August.

In addition to individual game reveals, other events are also being held under the Summer Game Fest banner. We’ll list these separately below.

Visit: Summer Game Fest

BitSummit Gaiden

Dates: June 27-28, 2020

BitSummit Gaiden will highlight more than 75 games from Japan and around the world on Discord and Twitch. Dev chats, Let’s Plays, and giveaways are promised, and streamable demos will be available via Utomik.

Visit: BitSummit

Guerrilla Collective Live

Dates: June 6- 8, 2020

The Guerrilla Collective Live is a three-day indie focused event from The MIX, who run one of the most reliably excellent ancillary E3 events. It’s produced with help from the Kinda Funny team and hosted by Greg Miller. Confirmed exhibitors include 11 Bit Studios, Thunderful, Paradox Interactive, Raw Fury, and Coffee Stain Studios. The event promises game announcements for every platform.

Watch here: Twitch

IGN Summer of Gaming

Dates: June 2020

IGN’s Summer of Gaming will feature announcements from a host of big-name publishers and indies. The main event is the IGN Expo, which runs on June 5, 8 and 9. It includes announcements from CD Projekt Red, Deep Silver, Devolver Digital, Sega, Ubisoft, Blizzard, and Xbox, to name a few. The PC Gaming Show is also part of IGN’s lineup.

Watch here: IGN

Future Games Show

Dates: June 6, 2020

GamesRadar is fronting the Future Games Show, an hour-long show which promises “exclusive trailers, announcements, and deep dives on existing AAA and indie games.” All that in one hour. Impressive.

Watch here: Twitch

Gamescom Opening Night Live

Dates: August 24, 2020

Gamescom Opening Night Live returns for its second year and is once again hosted by the ever-present Geoff Keighly. We’re not sure if there will be any games left to announce by August, but the event acts as a lead-in to this year’s digital-only Gamescom expo.

Watch here: Gamescom

GameSpot’s Play for All

Dates: June, 2020

Gamespot’s Play for All features a familiar lineup of companies with Bethesda, Larian Studios, Bandai Namco, and Square Enix all promising content. The event runs across all of CBS Interactive’s gaming channels, including GameSpot, Giant Bomb, and Metacritic. Kinda Funny’s Greg Miller and NoClip’s Danny O’Dwyer will also be on hand to flesh out over 100 hours of content.

Watch here: YouTube

Indie Live Expo 2020

Dates: June 6, 2020

Indie Live Expo 2020 will deliver an “information-based live stream for indie games, developers, and gamers.” Sony’s Shuhei Yoshida is among the industry figureheads delivering personal messages.

Watch here: Indie Live Expo

Kinda Funny Games Showcase

Dates: June, 2020

The Kinda Funny Games team are continuing their daily video games coverage throughout the summer. They are also producing the three-day Guerrilla Collective Live event in collaboration with The MIX, and will host another Kinda Funny Games Showcase in June.

Watch here: YouTube

The MIX

The MIX is one of our favourite indie game shows. The organisers always curate an eclectic collection of games, many of which become hits and GOTY contenders. This year, The MIX is behind Guerrilla Collective Live.

New Game+ Expo

Dates: June 23, 2020

NGPX is an online showcase of new and upcoming releases from a range of developers, including many from Japan. You can look forward to hearing from Atlus, Arc System Works, Aksys, SNK, NIS America, Spike Chunsoft, and Natsume.

Visit: NGPX

PC Gaming Show

Dates: June 6, 2020

The annual PC Gaming Show is sometimes overlong, but it usually contains a few gems that would be otherwise overlooked in the E3 hubbub. (Say hello, Maneater.) This year’s show is also included as part of Guerrilla Collective Live and the IGN Summer of Gaming schedule.

Watch here: Twitch

Steam Game Festival: Summer Edition

Dates: June 9 – 14, 2020

Valve’s Steam Game Festival highlights PC games due for release within the next year. Free limited-time demos and short playable experiences are planned, alongside some exclusive developer interviews. Naturally, every game can be added to your Steam wish list.

Visit: Steam

Publisher Press Conferences

2K

Dates: May 19 / TBC

The Mafia Trilogy has already been announced and two-thirds released. 2K is also participating with IGN Summer of Gaming, Summer Game Fest, and Gamespot’s Play For All.

Activision

Dates: TBC

On a recent earnings call, Activision promised “several remastered and reimagined experiences” for release in 2020. We can also expect news on the next Call of Duty and a brand new Crash Bandicoot game. Keep an eye on the Summer Game Fest for more details.

Bandai Namco

Dates: TBC

Bandai Namco is showing new products via IGN’s Summer of Gaming and Summer Game Fest.

Bethesda At Home

Dates: Ongoing

Bethesda is broadcasting  Bethesda At Home live streams weekly throughout the season. Additional announcements will also be released via Summer Game Fest.

Watch here: Twitch

Capcom

Dates: TBC

At the time of writing, we have no news on Capcom’s plans. Watch this space.

Devolver Direct

Dates: June, 2020

We’re hopeful that Nina Struthers will once again front Devolver Digital’s annual presser. A recent tweet from the company said: “Devolver Direct 2020 is happening but we’re not sure when due to THESE UNCERTAIN TIMES. Should be a good one though.” Devolver’s output also forms part of IGN’s summer offering.

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Watch here: Twitch

EA Play Live

Dates: June 18, 2020

Will FIFA 21 and Madden NFL 21 feature a “behind closed doors” mode? Discover that – and much more – at EA Play Live. It’s rumoured that we’ll get our first look at the next Dragon Age game and Anthem‘s big revamp.

Watch here: EA Play

Epic Games

Dates: Ongoing

Epic Games has already confirmed that Fortnite is coming to PS5 and Xbox Series X at launch. The company also unveiled Unreal Engine 5 with an impressive real-time PS5 demo. More announcements will come via Summer Game Fest and IGN throughout the summer.

Watch here: Twitch

CD Projekt Red (Night City Wire)

Dates: June 11, 2020

Cyberpunk 2077 developer CD Projekt Red will broadcast a Night City Wire live stream on June 11. Expect new gameplay footage from one of the year’s most anticipated games.

Watch here: Twitch

Paradox Insider

Dates: June 6, 2020

Paradox Insider will be broadcast as part of Guerrilla Collective Live. Look forward to more information on Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines 2.

Watch here: Twitch

PlayStation State of Play

Dates: Ongoing

Sony’s first PlayStation State of Play streams of the season focused on the upcoming PS4 releases The Last of Us Part II and Ghost of Tsushima. We expect more editions over the summer, continuing this week with our first look at games running on PlayStation 5. Tune in on Thursday, June 4, at 1:00 pm PT.

Watch here: YouTube

Nintendo

Dates: TBC

It’s rumoured that the Nintendo Direct for planned June has been delayed due to the impact of Covid-19. Nonetheless, we should get regular updates from the House of Mario over the summer. Paper Mario: The Oragami King was recently announced out of nowhere, and a collection HD remasters on Switch is rumoured to celebrate Super Mario’s 35th Anniversary.

Sega

Dates: TBC

Sega of America and Sega of Europe are confirmed to be participating in IGN’s and Gamespot’s events.

Square Enix

Dates: TBC

Square Enix has reportedly abandoned plans for replacement E3 press conference. Instead, the company is focussing on individual game reveals via Summer Game Fest, IGN’s Summer of Gaming, and Gamespot’s Play For All.

Stadia

Although there’s no confirmation of a summer Stadia Connect broadcast, we wouldn’t spill our porridge if Google tries to give its game streaming platform a bit of a relaunch. The Stadia Pro giveaway in April was a good start.

Tennocon 2020

Dates: July 11, 2020

Digital Extreme’s dedicated Warframe conference is going all-digital and included as part of the Summer Game Fest programme. Paid conference packs are available, each including in-game cosmetics or physical gear. A portion of all ticket proceeds will support Autism Ontario London and The Alzheimer Society London.

Visit: Tennocon

Ubisoft Forward

Dates: July 12, 2020

Expect Ubisoft’s summer presentation to have a familiar feel with more details expected on Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla, Gods & Monsters, Rainbow Six: Quarantine, and Watch Dogs: Legion. We might even see Skull & Bones again. A brand new game is also promised.

Watch here: YouTube

Xbox 20/20 (Inside Xbox)

Dates: Monthly from May

Although the first look at Xbox Series X ‘gameplay’ went over like a lead balloon, there’s still plenty to get excited about. July’s Xbox 20/20 promises more on titles in development at Xbox Game Studios such as Halo: Infinite, Hellblade 2, and – dare we speculate – a new Fable? Xbox content is also included as part of Summer Game Fest, IGN’s Summer of Gaming, and GameSpot’s Play for All.

Watch here: Mixer

WB Games

Dates: TBC

Will WB Games ever reveal the Batman game they’ve been teasing? We hope to see that, and more from Lego Star Wars: The Skywalker Saga. WB Games is participating in Summer Game Fest.


As you can see, it’s a busy summer with multiple events all vying for attention of gamers. We’ll endeavour to keep this page as up to date as possible, but let us know via Facebook or Twitter if we’ve missed something.

E3 is dead. Long live E3. We didn’t think we’d miss it.

Enjoyed this article?

Found it interesting, entertaining, useful, or informative? Maybe it even saved you some money. That's great to hear! Sadly, independent publishing is struggling worse than ever, and Thumbsticks is no exception. So please, if you can afford to, consider supporting us via Patreon or buying us a coffee.


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Thumbsticks editor and connoisseur of Belgian buns. Currently playing: Dragon Quest XI, Animal Crossing: New Horizons, and Transistor.

Guides

What does the new title screen mean at the end of The Last of Us Part II?

Warning: This article will contain general location, character and story spoilers for The Last of Us Part II.

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Naughty Dog / Thumbsticks

Warning: This article will contain general location, character and story spoilers for The Last of Us Part II.

You’ll be familiar with the title screen of The Last of Us Part II, even if you’ve not played the game. Why? Because reviewers tweeted out the title screen weeks before the game even released. (A secondary embargo for when you can tell people you’ve got the game – and limiting the visual bits you can use on your social media to just the title screen – is now a thing. It’s weird, we know.)

But you know what the title screen looks like, that’s the important thing. It’s a small motorboat, bobbing around, in the fog. It’s simultaneously serene and ominous, something that The Last of Us does especially well as a series.

When you complete The Last of Us Part II, however, the title screen changes. There’s the obligatory New Game Plus mode, of course, but the visuals have changed, too.

It’s still a boat – a similar-looking one, at that – but it’s in a different setting. Gone is the fog and the gloom, replaced instead with waves, crashing on a sandy beach, and a circular white building in the distance.

Where is it, though?

Where is the location in the new title screen of The Last of Us Part II?

First up, the straightforward bit: It’s Santa Catalina Island in Southern California, or just Catalina for short.

You might be thinking it could be absolutely anywhere, but that round, white building is really distinctive. Here’s a side-by-side comparison:

Source (top): Flickr | Source (bottom): Naughty Dog

(It’s not exactly the same angle and the design is slightly stylised, but the building is the Catalina Island Casino Ballroom and Theater, in case you were wondering. It’s located in Avalon, the largest settlement on Catalina.)

Don’t worry if you thought you’d missed something on your playthrough, though. You don’t actually visit Catalina, the location of the new title screen, on a playthrough of The Last of Us Part II.

But it is somewhere that’s been mentioned in the game. Here come the spoilers. Seriously. Get out of here if you’ve not finished The Last of Us Part II yet.

What’s the significance of the new title screen in The Last of Us Part II?

So, you’ve nearly completed The Last of Us Part II. You’ve done the prologue, including the upsetting bit. You’ve completed the three days of Seattle as Ellie, then you’ve gone back and done it all again from Abby’s point of view. You’ve been to the farm with Ellie, Dina and the potato, and now you’re back in Abby’s shoes, in Santa Barbara.

Why? Because, before he died, Owen had been fixing up a sailboat and planned to make his way from Seattle to Santa Barbara, looking for the Fireflies.

Abby and her friends were all originally Fireflies. They were displaced and joined the WLF looking for a new cause after the Salt Lake City incident with Joel and Marlene, but Owen had been hearing rumours that the Fireflies were getting the band back together.

He had heard from multiple people that the Fireflies had a presence in Santa Barbara. Abby dismissed it all as rumour at the time, but with Owen now gone and no other focus for her and Lev, chasing down the Fireflies seems like as good a plan as any other.

So they heard to Santa Barbara and – after trading a pistol for some information – find themselves on Constance Avenue, looking for number 2425.

The house is empty but, hidden in the basement, they find a small barracks with beds, supplies, and a radio. Next to the radio, Lev finds a list:

  • San Diego KGFS183
  • Big Sur KBSG583
  • Catalina Island KZRQ639
  • Los Angeles KSPG374

The Last of Us Part II radio frequencies

They proceed to call what they presume to be Firefly bases and get nothing but static. Abby has all but given up hope when “Catalina” responds. She introduces herself as a former Firefly and asks to come in. They test her on who was in charge at her last post, at Saint Mary’s Hospital in Salt Lake City. When Abby answers correctly – it was her father – she and Lev make to leave for Catalina, then get abducted by a group of human traffickers called the Rattlers on the driveway to the house.

And we all just assumed that it was the Rattlers on the radio, right? Messing with people, perhaps. Or, more likely, using whispers, the promise of a group of Fireflies to lure people to the house, and the radio as a notification that someone had stepped into the trap.

Fast forward right to the end of the game. Ellie has upped and left Dina and the potato to continue the search for Abby and vengeance, and found her strung up on “the pillars” by the Rattlers. She cuts Abby down, Abby grabs Lev, and they make their way to a pair of small motorboats, in the fog, on the beach. We catch a glimpse of the original title screen, from a different angle.

You think everything’s done, then Ellie has one more stab at revenge, an exercise in futility that sees Ellie lose two fingers, and the pair sitting in the shallow water, spent. There’s no fight left in either. They get in their separate boats and leave.

One final sequence plays, with Ellie returning to the farm to find Dina and baby potato have left, presumably to move back to Jackson. Then the credits roll, followed by the new title screen.

We know the boat on the beach isn’t Ellie’s. She’s back in Wyoming, an entirely landlocked state with no coastline. So by process of elimination, that means the boat on the new title screen must belong to Abby and Lev.

So what does it mean? What’s the significance of the new title screen after you complete The Last of Us Part II?

If you look closely at the digital recreation of the Catalina Island Casino you can see flags, flapping on its roof. That’s not unusual; the building sports flags year-round. But with a quarter of a century passed since the start of the outbreak, any flags that were left there after the apocalypse would surely have blown away or decayed by now. Which means someone must be maintaining the flags. Which means someone must be living at the Catalina Island Casino.

We can’t say for sure that it’s the Fireflies. We don’t know for sure that the person Abby spoke to is genuinely with the group. But what we can say for certain is that Abby and Lev have travelled to Catalina Island to check it out.

That’s definitely their boat, and that’s definitely Catalina.


Forgotten what happened in the original The Last of Us? You’ll want to read our comprehensive story recap.

Enjoyed this article?

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What is the apartment 302 safe code in The Last of Us Part II?

The apartment safe code in The Last of Us Part II isn’t actually written down, which makes it a bit trickier to find than the others.

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The Last of Us Part II apartment 302 safe code note
Naughty Dog

The apartment 302 safe code in The Last of Us Part II isn’t actually written down, which makes it a bit trickier to find than the others.

So you know the drill by now. You find a safe in The Last of Us Part II, then you need to find a code to open it and access the goodies inside. (Don’t get too excited. The goodies are usually two shotgun shells and a bottle of rubbing alcohol; it’s hardly the crown jewels.)

Often, the code is literally written down for you. There’s a note, left by a (presumably-no-longer-a) survivor, advising their friends or loved ones how to access their disappointing trove. Or as chance may have it, allowing the player to nab some supplies.

Sometimes, the code isn’t written down at all. Instead, the note maker has left a clue, a nod to the environment to find the code. That might be a winning lottery ticket or a suspiciously short wireless password. But in the case of the apartment 302 safe code, it’s not so obvious.

You’ll find reference to the safe on a note that’s been passed back and forth between two apartments. After the evacuation of downtown, by chance, next-door neighbours realise they’re not alone. Both apartments chose not to leave, for reasons their own. But far from the “humans are the real monsters” narrative pushed in The Last of Us Part II and its ilk, these neighbours, who probably never spoke in the before times, begin communicating. Getting to know one another. Helping each other out. Sharing freshly baked cornbread and vodka. It’s heartwarming stuff.

We can track their conversation, back and forth, on a scrap of paper passed under locked doors. Then tragedy strikes and apartment 302, following a death, readies to leave. They pass a note under next door advising them of the code to the safe, telling them to help themselves. Next door writes back a thank you but declines the offer, which means there’s still something in the safe for your grubby little mitts.

But what is the apartment 302 safe code? The clue to this one is in the apartment number:

“I’m leaving our door unlocked and some supplies in our safe. Combo is our apartment number then your apartment number.”

The apartment you’re standing in is 302. You can see that from the board in the room, and it’s also mentioned in the note. So you go to the safe and try 302-303 and nothing happens. Why? Because in some buildings, like houses on some streets, the apartment numbers are even one on side of the corridor and odd on the other.

That actually makes the apartment 302 safe code 302-204.


Forgotten what happened in the original The Last of Us? You’ll want to read our comprehensive story recap. Looking for more The Last of Us Part II safe codes? Head over to our guides section.

Enjoyed this article?

Found it interesting, entertaining, useful, or informative? Maybe it even saved you some money. That's great to hear! Sadly, independent publishing is struggling worse than ever, and Thumbsticks is no exception. So please, if you can afford to, consider supporting us via Patreon or buying us a coffee.


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Guides

What is the hotel gym safe code in The Last of Us Part II?

Another safe, another code to find. Unfortunately, the hotel gym safe code in The Last of Us Part II is a difficult one to find.

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The Last of Us Part II hotel gym safe code
Naughty Dog / Thumbsticks

Another safe, another code to find. Unfortunately, the hotel gym safe code in The Last of Us Part II is a difficult one to find.

Most of the safe codes you’ll find in The Last of Us Part II are fairly straightforward. You’ll discover a note in the environment, sometimes on a dead body, with some whatever their last thoughts were. Then at the bottom, there’ll be a note that says something like, “When I’m gone, if you want to use my stuff, the safe code is…”

It’s a strangely altruistic turn for a game that insists that, in the event of the end of the world, people would bash each other’s brains in for a can of beans. Maybe humans are the real monsters and all that.

But sometimes you have to do a bit more work to discern the code. One code, called “the big win”, is particularly difficult to find. (But oh so obvious when you see it.)

The hotel gym safe code in The Last of Us Part II is similarly obscured. You’ll find a note on the notice board in the gym’s coffee shop which says the safe code is the same as the wireless password. But what’s the wireless password?

The Last of Us Part II hotel gym safe code note

There’s nobody around to ask. No helpful barista in the coffee shop or trainer in the gym to give you the password. So how do you find the code to open it, then? Well, you could skip down a little bit and find the answer. We will supply it.

But if you want to know where to find it for yourself? Look out for the reception desk. It’s behind some glass doors labelled “Hotel BlacRay” in the room with the free weights and cardio equipment. (That’s the personal trainer’s reception desk in the gym itself, not in the hallway outside. And if you’re in the pool area, you need to go through the changing rooms to find it.)

Behind the desk, there’s a sign with the wireless passcode which is, coincidentally, a six-digit number. That’s not a very secure wireless passphrase. It would not take very long at all to crack that and isn’t particularly realistic. But the fact it’s a six-digit number should make you suspicious.

You guessed it. The wireless passcode is also the hotel gym safe code. You’ll find the safe in the cupboard across the corridor from the gym area, next to the stairwell. (And the code is 121879, if you can’t be bothered to look, but it’s mere metres away. That’s lazy.)


Forgotten what happened in the original The Last of Us? You’ll want to read our comprehensive story recap.

Enjoyed this article?

Found it interesting, entertaining, useful, or informative? Maybe it even saved you some money. That's great to hear! Sadly, independent publishing is struggling worse than ever, and Thumbsticks is no exception. So please, if you can afford to, consider supporting us via Patreon or buying us a coffee.


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What is ‘the big win’ safe code in The Last of Us Part II?

One of the safe codes in The Last of Us Part II is more difficult to solve than the others. What is “the big win”, then?

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The Last of Us Part II The Big Win safe code
Naughty Dog / Thumbsticks

One of the safe codes in The Last of Us Part II is more difficult to solve than the others. What is “the big win”, then?

The Last of Us Part II does something interesting with its codes for doors, gates and safes. Where most games would have you simply learn the code, then once that’s ticked off in your quest log, will handle the mechanics of entering the code automatically. In Part II, you need to not only learn the codes but remember and enter them manually.

Sometimes, that’ll mean codes written down on a sheet of paper. You’ll find that in your inventory of collectables to refer back to. Other times, the code won’t be revealed directly in a note or letter, so much as hinted at.

Most of the time, that’s pretty obvious: “The code for this safe is the same as the code for the East Gate,” or something of that ilk. Or perhaps it will point you to something in the environment; one such instance has the code written on a drywipe board not 20 feet from the safe it opens. (Information security and environmental storytelling have forever been at odds, haven’t they?)

But there’s one safe code in The Last of Us Part II that’s a bit more cryptic, a bit less obvious:

PS. Still using “the big win” as the combination.

So what is “the big win”, then?

We racked our brains over this one for a while. Maybe it’s a date of something, a big victory for a sports team, perhaps? Given that this safe is found in Seattle, and the Seattle Seahawks have won the Super Bowl once, we wondered if that might be it? But the Seahawks won their only pennant on February 2, 2014 – 02/02/14 – which is after Cordyceps Brian Infection “outbreak day” on September 26, 2013. The world already ended just before the Seahawks won the Super Bowl. That’s sad.

Could it be some sort of puzzle or substitution, then? We thought about the position of the first letters of the three words in the alphabet – T = 20, B = 02, W = 23 – which didn’t work, either. There didn’t seem to be any obvious solutions.

So we went back to the building where we found the note to search for more clues and spotted the answer almost instantly. On the corkboard, near to where the note is found, is a lottery ticket. And on that lottery ticket, ringed in red, are three numbers. “The big win” refers to a winning lottery ticket that they’ve pinned up on the board for posterity.

It’s quite a small clue, so you can be forgiven for missing it. You’ll also need to squint a bit to see it, especially if you’re not put a scope on your rifle yet. So if you’re still struggling, “the big win” code in The Last of Us Part II is 17-38-07.

Inside “the big win” safe you’ll find a hunting pistol – a powerful, single-shot beast that can be upgraded with a scope – and a bunch of ammo. It’s worth busting that one open.


Forgotten what happened in the original The Last of Us? You’ll want to read our comprehensive story recap.

Enjoyed this article?

Found it interesting, entertaining, useful, or informative? Maybe it even saved you some money. That's great to hear! Sadly, independent publishing is struggling worse than ever, and Thumbsticks is no exception. So please, if you can afford to, consider supporting us via Patreon or buying us a coffee.


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What are the Death Stranding PC System Requirements?

Death Stranding is coming to PC in July, here are the game’s minimum and recommended PC system requirements.

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Death Stranding System Requirements
Kojima Productions

Death Stranding is released on PC in July. Here are the game’s minimum and recommended PC system requirements.

Kojima Productions and publisher 505 Games have revealed Death Stranding’s PC system requirements in advance of its release on Steam and the Epic Games Store.

The PC edition of Death Stranding will also include new Half-Life related content, including cosmetics and cross-over story content that features an encounter with Combine Strider. As per the press release: “A familiar face has crossed over into the world of Death Stranding, impersonating Bridges’ employees and sending request emails prompting Sam to locate and secure companion cubes throughout the world.”

Here are the PC specs you need to experience Sam Porter Bridges’ adventure in resolutions of up to 1080p. The game is out on July 14, 2020.

Death Stranding PC System Requirements

Minimum 30fps – 720p (1280×720)

  • Operating System: Windows 10
  • Processor: Intel Core i5-3470 or AMD Ryzen 3 1200
  • Memory: 8 GB
  • Graphics: GeForce GTX 1050 3 GB or AMD Radeon RX 560 4 GB
  • Direct X: Version 12
  • HDD Space: 80GB
  • Sound Cards: DirectX compatible

Recommended 30fps – 1080p (1920×1080)

  • Operating System: Windows 10
  • Processor: Intel Core i5-4460 or AMD Ryzen 5 1400
  • Memory: 8 GB
  • Graphics: GeForce GTX 1050 Ti 4 GB or Radeon RX 570 4 GB
  • Direct X: Version 12
  • HDD Space: 80GB
  • Sound Cards: DirectX compatible

Recommended 60fps – 1080p (1920×1080)

  • Operating System: Windows 10
  • Processor: Intel Core i7-3770 or AMD Ryzen 5 1600
  • Memory: 8 GB
  • Graphics: GeForce GTX 1060 6 GB or AMD Radeon RX 590
  • Direct X: Version 12
  • HDD Space: 80GB
  • Sound Cards: DirectX compatible

Death Stranding System Requirements


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