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What Nintendo Switch games support Tate Mode?

Docked Mode, Table Top Mode, Hand Held mode…Tate Mode? Here’s a list of every Nintendo Switch game that supports vertical display.

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Nintendo Switch Tate Mode

Docked Mode, Table Top Mode, Hand Held mode…Tate Mode? The Nintendo Switch is a versatile device. Here’s a list of every Switch game that supports vertical display.

The flexibility of the Nintendo Switch is one of the keys to its success. It’s a console equally happy hooked up to a TV at home, or in your hands for gaming on the go. This flexibility also allows for some games to be played using a vertical screen orientation, or Tate Mode.

Gaming on vertical screens was a common enough sight during the heyday of the arcade, and is the predominant orientation for modern-day mobile and tablet gaming. 

The Nintendo Switch – with a few caveats – is well-suited to offer another home to games that use a portrait display, and its ever-growing software library features a generous selection of classic arcade games, and ports of recent mobile hits.

Here’s our round-up of games that support Tate mode, and how to play them.

How do you play Switch games in Tate mode?

Setting a game to display in Tate Mode happens on a software level. You don’t need to change anything within the Switch’s system settings. Just fiddle around in the menus of each compatible game to find the right setting. 

Playing in TV Mode

Playing in Tate mode on a big screen is tricky, but not impossible. If your Nintendo Switch is hooked up to a computer monitor, rather than a TV set, you may well be able to rotate the screen 90 degrees to play compatible games in this format.

Naturally, it’s much easier to play games that support Tate mode with the Switch removed from its dock. However, this is not without a few of its own challenges

Playing in Tabletop Mode

In Tabletop Mode things are relatively simple. You’ll most likely need a stand – the Wii U GamePad stand is a good substitute – but all you need to do is remove the Joy Cons, turn the Switch on its side, and set the display on your compatible games to vertical or portrait mode.

Playing in Handheld Mode

In Handheld Mode, games that support touchscreen controls – such as Pinball FX 3 – can be played just fine. Games that require traditional control inputs might need a little assistance.

One solution is to pick up a Flip Grip from Jeremy Parish, Mike Choi, and Fangamer. This Kickstarter-funded peripheral clips to your Joy-Con controllers, and cradles the Nintendo Switch in a snug vertical orientation. By all accounts it’s a well-designed solution with excellent production values.  

Nintendo Switch Flip Grip

Nintendo Switch – List of Tate Mode games

All that leaves is the list of games. Let us know if you think we’ve missed anything.
(Last updated: Jan 31, 2019)

  • 12 Orbits
  • A Normal Lost Phone
  • Another Lost Phone: Laura’s Story
  • Arcade Archives Alpha Mission
  • Arcade Archives Argus
  • Arcade Archives Donkey Kong
  • Arcade Archives Donkey Kong Jr.
  • Arcade Archives Heroic Episode
  • Arcade Archives Omega Fighter
  • Arcade Archives Punch Out!!
  • Arcade Archives Route-16
  • Arcade Archives Star Force
  • Arcade Archives Terra Cresta
  • Atari Flashback Classics – Centipede
  • Atari Flashback Classics – Fire Truck
  • Atari Flashback Classics – Maze Invaders
  • Atari Flashback Classics – Millipede
  • Atari Flashback Classics – Monte Carlo
  • Atari Flashback Classics – Soccer
  • Atari Flashback Classics – Super Breakout
  • Atari Flashback Classics – Super Bug
  • Bingo For Nintendo Switch
  • Chess Ultra
  • Danmaku Unlimited 3
  • Downwell
  • Dragon Blaze
  • Gain Ground
  • Gunbarich
  • Gunbird
  • Gunbird2
  • Ikaruga
  • Japanese Mah-jongg
  • Johnny Turbo’s Arcade: Nitro Ball
  • Lost Phone Stories
  • Mantis Burn Racing
  • Mutant Mudds Collection
  • Namco Museum
  • Namco Museum – Dig Dug
  • Namco Museum – Galaga
  • Namco Museum – Galaga ’88
  • Namco Museum – Pac-Man
  • Namco Museum – Tower of Druaga
  • Penguin Wars
  • Physical Contact Speed
  • Pinball Fx3
  • Psyvariar Delta
  • Samurai Aces
  • Sega Ages: Gain Ground
  • SNK 40th Collection – Alpha Mission
  • SNK 40th Collection – Chopper I
  • SNK 40th Collection – Fantasy
  • SNK 40th Collection – Guerilla War
  • SNK 40th Collection – Ikari Warriors
  • SNK 40th Collection – Munch Mobile
  • SNK 40th Collection – Sasuke vs Commander
  • SNK 40th Collection – Search and Rescue
  • SNK 40th Collection – Time Soldiers
  • SNK 40th Collection – TNK III
  • SNK 40th Collection – Vanguard
  • SNK 40th Collection – Victory Road
  • Spiritsphere DX
  • Stern Pinball Arcade
  • Strikers 1945
  • Strikers 1945 Ii
  • The Pinball Arcade
  • Zaccaria Pinball

Bear in mind that not all games support the Flip Grip peripheral. Jeremy Parish at Retronauts is keeping an up-to-date list of those that do.

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Guides

How to get a refund for Rocket League on Mac and Linux

Rocket League developer Psyonix is ending support for the game on macOS and Linux. Here’s why, and how you can get a refund for the game on Steam.

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Rocket League - Mac and Linux
Psyonix / Thumbsticks

Rocket League developer Psyonix is ending support for the game on macOS and Linux. Here’s why, and how you can get a refund for the game on Steam.

Psyonix announced last week that support for the Mac and Linux versions of Rocket League will end in March 2020. A final update for the game will disable all online functionality, including in-game purchases, and online multiplayer modes.

Why is support ending for Rocket League on Mac and Linux?

In a post on the Rocket League sub-Reddit, Psyonix has provided detail on the decision to end Mac and Linux support. The studio’s Psyonix_Devin explains that the forthcoming update to DirectX 11 is the primary factor, saying:

“Unfortunately, our macOS and Linux native clients depend on our DX9 implementation for their OpenGL renderer to function. When we stop supporting DX9, those clients stop working. To keep these versions functional, we would need to invest significant additional time and resources in a replacement rendering pipeline such as Metal on macOS or Vulkan/OpenGL4 on Linux.”

Coupled with the fact that macOS and Linux users account for only 0.3% of the game’s active player based, it becomes a little easier to see why the decision was made, however infuriating it may be.

Psyonix has now opened a refund programme on Steam for anyone who purchased the game on Mac or Linux. Its launch was not without a few problems, but things now appear to be running smoothly.

How to get a Steam refund for Rocket League on Mac and Linux

To get a refund on the Mac or Linux version of Rocket League, follow the following instructions.

  • Visit to the Steam Support website
  • Select Purchases
  • Select Rocket League
  • If necessary select View complete purchasing history
  • Select I would like a refund
  • Select I’d like to request a refund
  • From the Reason drop-down menu, select My issue isn’t listed
  • In Notes, enter the following statement: “please refund my Mac/Linux version of Rocket League, Psyonix will be discontinuing support”
  • If you encounter any issues, you can also try raising a ticket via the Steam Support page

Good luck!


Visit the Thumbsticks guide section for help with everything from catching a Galarian Slowpoke in Pokémon Sword and Shield to re-paring your Xbox One and PlayStation 4 controllers.

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Guides

How to re-pair a PlayStation 4 controller

Has your PS4 controller stopped talking to your console? Here’s how to re-pair an errant PlayStation 4 controller.

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how to re-pair a PlayStation 4 controller
Sony / Thumbsticks

Has your PS4 controller stopped talking to your console? Here’s how to re-pair an errant PlayStation 4 controller.

There are lots of nice things about the PlayStation 4 controller. They’re all wireless for a start, which means you don’t have to sit cross-legged in front of the telly like in the good old days. They’re also rechargeable, which means you’ll never need to fumble for a battery.

Also, they light up! (That’s not important, particularly, but the first time you see the light bar react to something in-game is pretty neat.)

You can also use your PS4 controller to wake up your console. That’s ideal because the buttons on the front of the console itself are both hidden and completely baffling. Am I pressing the power button? No, I ejected the optical drive! Am I pressing the power button? No, that’s not, in fact, a button at all! It’s just one of the plastic ridges.

But if your PlayStation 4 controller – or DualShock 4, to give it its Sunday name – becomes unpaired, you’re going to have a bad time.

How does a PlayStation 4 controller become unpaired?

You can pair your DualShock 4 with other devices via the universal standard, Bluetooth. (Interestingly, the name – and symbol – for the technology is after Harald Bluetooth and his written rune, because he united the clans of Norway and Denmark, and Bluetooth unites devices.)

But if you do use your PS4 controller with something else – like your mobile phone or your PC – then you might find it doesn’t want to talk to your console any more.

What’s worse is it can happen entirely by accident. If you plug your DualShock 4 into your PC or laptop to charge it up, because it’s a USB port you have to hand, then it might pair up with your PC and not want to talk to your PlayStation 4 any more.

It can also happen if you haven’t used your PS4 in a while. If the battery in the DualShock 4 runs out and isn’t recharged, when it charges back up, it might struggle to talk to your console.

So if you’re all charged up with nowhere to go, here’s how you fix it.

How to re-pair a PlayStation 4 controller

Unlike the Xbox One controller, which couldn’t be more straightforward, re-pairing a PlayStation 4 controller is a bit more fiddly.

  • If you have another controller that is still paired:
    • Turn on your console with the working controller
    • Wait for your un-paired PS4 controller to go to sleep (if the lights are on)
    • Go to Settings > Devices > Bluetooth devices from the PlayStation 4 menu
    • Select the controller you’re having issues with and hit ‘Delete’
    • Plug the controller into the USB ports on the console
    • Hit the ‘PS’ button in the middle of the controller to wake it and pair it up
  • If you don’t have another controller you can use:
    • Power off your console
    • Wait for your un-paired PS4 controller to go to sleep (if the lights are on)
    • Grab a paperclip (yes, a paperclip)
    • Use the pointy end to press the recessed ‘reset’ button on the back of the controller
    • Hold the paperclip in there for a while (let’s call it 10 seconds to be safe)
    • Plug the controller into one of the USB ports on the console
    • Hit the ‘PS’ button in the middle of the controller to wake and pair it up

When the controller turns back on it should both power on the console and re-pair it with your PS4. Problem solved.

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How to know if you have a shiny Pokémon in Sword and Shield

Getting a shiny Pokémon in Sword or Shield isn’t easy. If you don’t know what you are looking for, you might not even notice. Here’s how you can tell.

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Shiny Pokémon in Sword and Shield
Game Freak / Thumbsticks

Getting a shiny Pokémon in Sword or Shield isn’t easy. If you don’t know what you are looking for, you might not even notice if you catch one. Here’s how you can tell.

The chances of getting a shiny Pokémon are fairly slim, with odds of 4096 to 1 of encountering one. And unlike last year’s Pokemon Let’s Go, Pikachu!, and Let’s Go, Eevee!, it isn’t possible to tell if a Pokémon is shiny before you battle it.

Here’s how to know that you are battling a shiny Pokémon, and how to tell if you already have one in your party or box.

How to know when you are battling a shiny Pokémon

When you encounter a shiny, it will be surrounded by sparkles. It looks, well, shiny. Most shinies can be spotted by a change in colour, but if you’re not familiar with the full Pokédex, looking for the sparkles is the simplest method of identification during battle.

In Pokémon Sword and Shield, there are two types of sparkles to look out for: normal, and square. Square shinies are all new and ultra-rare. If you encounter a shiny there’s a 1 in 16 chance it will feature square sparkles. That means a 1 in 65536 chance overall. Eek!

How to know if you (already) have a shiny Pokémon

If you capture a shiny, or want to know if you’ve already obtained one without realising it, press [X] and navigate to the Pokémon menu. Select Pokémon, then Check Summary. You will see a range of details, including its name, type, original trainer, and ID No. A red symbol comprised of two stars is displayed in the Markings section if the Pokémon is shiny.

Shiny Pokémon symbol

There are shiny variants of almost every Pokémon in Sword and Shield. However, some can never be shiny and others are shiny-locked, meaning they cannot be bred.

None of the game’s Legendary Pokémon can be shiny, and all Pokémon obtained via gifts are locked.

Shiny versions of Sword and Shield‘s starters – Grookey, Scorbunny, and Sobble – can only be obtained through breeding. Unlike previous generations, they cannot be obtained at the start of the game.

Increasing your chances of encountering a shiny during normal play is an art all of its own. Instagram user, shinyinstinct has created this handy cheat sheet to help you get started.

https://www.instagram.com/p/B4-b4yvlOKz

Visit our guides section for more useful video game tips, including details on how to get a Galarian Slowpoke. You can also follow Thumbsticks on Flipboard, Facebook, Google News, and Twitter for daily news updates.

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Guides

How to re-pair an Xbox One controller

Has your controller stopped talking to your console? Here’s how to re-pair an errant Xbox One controller.

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how to re-pair an Xbox One controller
Xbox / Thumbsticks

Has your controller stopped talking to your console? Here’s how to re-pair an errant Xbox One controller.

One of the nice things about modern consoles is wireless controllers. You don’t have to sit three feet from the TV! You don’t have to get off the sofa to turn the console on! We may not have flying cars and hoverboards, but it’s still the future, dammit.

But if your controller gets disconnected from your console, it can be frustrating. For starters, you have to get up and press the button on the front of the console, but it only gets worse when you try to actually play a game.

How does an Xbox One controller become unpaired?

Sometimes, an Xbox One controller will become unpaired from its console purely by accident. Maybe there was just a technical gremlin, or perhaps the battery ran out and the controller hadn’t been turned on in a while. These things happen.

But usually, if your Xbox One controller becomes unpaired, it’s because of something you’ve done.

Sometimes that will be on purpose. Maybe you’ve taken your controller to a friend’s house to play some multiplayer and you paired it to another console. Or maybe you’ve used it to play games on a PC, or paired it with a smartphone.

Or sometimes, it can be entirely by accident. If you have a rechargeable battery pack and you pop a USB cable into your Xbox One controller into a USB port on a PC or laptop to charge, it’ll pair itself up with the computer. Then when you come to hit the button to turn your console on, the controller won’t know which console to talk to, and nothing will happen.

That’s when you’ll need to know how to re-pair an Xbox One controller.

How to re-pair an Xbox One controller

If your Xbox One controller has fallen out with you, for whatever reason, the operation to re-pair it is wonderfully simple.

  • Turn off your Xbox One console
  • Grab a USB cable (that’s Micro USB, not the newer USB-C standard)
  • Plug the big end (the USB-A adapter) into your Xbox One console
  • Plug the small end (the Micro USB adapter) into your Xbox One controller
  • Press the big ‘Xbox’ button in the middle of the controller
  • This will wake up the Xbox One console, and re-pair the Xbox One controller at the same time

That’s it. It’s really simple. Just plug in a USB cable, hit the big button, and let the pairing process work its magic.

(And if you were looking for how to repair an Xbox One controller – that’s repair, as in physically broken, not re-pair, as in pair it up again – then this guide doesn’t cover that. There can be lots of things physically wrong with a controller, far too many for one guide to cover, and if you take it apart you might just make it worse.)

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Guides

How to get a Galarian Slowpoke in Pokémon Sword and Shield

The Galarian Slowpoke is now available in Pokémon Sword and Shield. Here’s how to catch it.

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How to get the Galarian Slowpoke in Pokémon Sword and Shield
The Pokémon Company / Thumbsticks

The Galarian Slowpoke is now available in Pokémon Sword and Shield. Here’s how to catch it.

January’s Pokémon Direct revealed details of a two-part expansion pass for Pokémon Sword and Shield. The Isle of Armor and The Crown Tundra will be released in June and fall, adding two new areas to the Galar region, plus 200 extra Pokémon to discover.

A new update Pokémon Sword and Shield teases the expansion pass by introducing two new trainers, and a Galarian Slowpoke to catch.

To get your hands on the Galarian Slowpoke follow these simple steps.

How to get a Galarian Slowpoke

  1. Head to Wedgehurst train station
  2. Depending on which the version of the game you are playing, you’ll meet one of two new trainers – Klara in Sword or Avery in Shield – in the station lobby
  3. A Galarian Slowpoke will follow them into the station
  4. You can battle and catch the Slowpoke in the usual way. Use a Quick Ball to make swift work of it
  5. You can now add the Galarian Slowpoke to your team

It’s worth noting that the Galarian Slowpoke won’t be added to the Pokédex. We expect this will happen when The Isle of Armor DLC is released in June 2020.

Following the release of the content expansions, the Slowpoke can be evolved into a Galarian Slowbro in The Isle of Armor and a Galarian Slowking in The Crown Tundra.

Pre-purchase of the expansion pass is not required to catch the Galarian Slowpoke. However, if you do pay up front, you get access to a bonus Pikachu or Eevee uniform. Head to the Mystery Gift menu to redeem your new threads.


Follow Thumbsticks on Flipboard, Facebook, Google News, and Twitter for daily video game news updates. For help with more games, visit our guides section.

Support Thumbsticks

We hate to ask, but global advertising revenues are the lowest they've ever been. It's killing the online publishing world. If you like what we do and want to support free, quality games writing, then please consider supporting us via Patreon, buying us a coffee, or subscribing to our newsletter.


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